HOW TO PASS VERBAL REASONING TESTS 

228-page Verbal Reasoning Tests book!

Verbal reasoning tests are used widely by employers during assessment centres in order to select the right person(s) for the job. They are particularly common during selection processes for careers that require an ability to communicate both verbally and in written format with customers or clients.

Here are a number of important tips that will give you a better insight into verbal reasoning tests and how you can go about improving your scores.

Tip 1: Don’t aim for a set mark, aim to do the best you can
Many people ask me what the scoring criteria are for verbal reasoning tests. They want to know how many they need to get correct in order to pass. To be honest, every employer/test administrator will have a different standard. Tests of this nature in the public sector normally require a pass rate of 70%. My advice would be to not focus on the pass mark but instead focus on trying to get every question correct. Some employers will set the pass mark according to the overall average score amongst the applicants. Therefore, it is pointless worrying about the pass mark.

Tip 2: Practise verbal reasoning tests against the clock
The vast majority of verbal reasoning tests are timed; therefore, you need to practice under timed conditions. Savvy test takers will be fully aware of the amount of time they have to answer each question on average. I encourage you to do the same during your preparation.

Tip 3: Listen to the test administrator
Test administrators should be suitably qualified in order to administer the test. They will provide you with sufficient information on how to take the test and the rules/guidelines involved immediately prior to the real test. This is also your opportunity to ask any questions that you may have. In the majority of cases you will be given the opportunity to try a small number of sample questions.

Tip 4: Don’t let the ‘odd one out’ catch you out
Be prepared to be faced by a variety of test styles. The verbal reasoning test that you are required to undertake should be representative of the type of role you are applying for. That is why you do not see many verbal reasoning tests that require you to ‘select the odd one out’ or ‘fill in the missing words’ of a sentence, simply because the majority of occupational roles are not relevant to this type of test. Having said that, the Army still uses a ‘select the odd one out’ test during its selection process for soldiers.

Tip 5: Keep focused on the test
You should learn to concentrate intently on the test you are taking and the questions you are required to answer. You should learn to block everything that is irrelevant to the test out of your mind. That means not worrying about what the other test takers are doing or where they are in relation to you in the test! Focus on your own test only.

Tip 6: Preparation also includes rest and the right diet
Just about every other psychometric testing book out there will tell you to get some sleep the night before your test. The chances are, you won’t be able to rest fully the night before your test. My advice is to get plenty of rest in the fortnight before the test. Eat healthily, get some exercise (brisk walking is perfect) and avoid coffee and alcohol too. I see lots of people drinking energy drinks before their test. Energy drinks may claim to increase stimulation and concentration, but how long for is debatable. The danger is, once the effect wears off, you will start to feel lethargic. Choose clean, healthy water instead.

Tip 7: Obey the test administrator
Test administrators are required to keep a log of events during the test. They are required to write down any incidents that occur, such as noise in neighbouring rooms or interruptions that may occur. They are also required to write down any anomalies that occur with the test takers. Any information that is written down could be used to influence your scores, both good and bad. Follow all instructions carefully and stop writing when told to do so!

Tip 8: Be prepared to say ‘cannot say’
As part of your interview skills preparation you’re taught to always have something to say in response to a question. You never answer with “don’t know” or “can’t say”, instead you always seek to find a relevant response which will put you in a good light. So for many test takers it is unnerving to answer with the option ‘cannot say’. In fact this is often the reason some companies use this specific abbreviation – to test your nerve. So it is important to remember that ‘cannot say’ is only an abbreviation of the ‘cannot say on the information provided’ option and is a valid answer from observant and successful candidates.

HOW TO PASS VERBAL REASONING TESTS BOOK

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This comprehensive 200 page workbook is packed full of sample verbal reasoning test questions that are guaranteed to help you score high in your assessment.

How to pass Verbal Reasoning Tests

Let’s take a look at a sample verbal reasoning test question:

1. Read the following text before answering the questions as either TRUE (A), FALSE (B) or CANNOT SAY (C) from the information given.

Analysts prove forecasters wrong.

The Office for National Statistics said internet shopping and sales of household goods had been better in October compared with previous months.

However, sales of clothing and footwear, where many retailers cut prices before Christmas, were particularly weak.The increase came as a surprise to many analysts who were predicting a 0.4% fall in internet shopping and sales of household goods. The rise meant that retail sales volumes in the three months to January were up by 2.6% on the previous quarter. The final quarter of the year is a better guide to the underlying trend than one month’s figures.Some analysts cautioned that the heavy seasonal adjustment of the raw spending figures at the turn of the year made interpreting the data difficult.

Even so, the government will be relieved that spending appears to be holding up despite the squeeze on incomes caused by high inflation, rising unemployment, a weak housing market and the crisis in the eurozone.Retail sales account for less than half of total consumer spending and do not include the purchase of cars or eating out. The ONS said that its measure of inflation in the high street – the annual retail sales deflator – fell to 2.2% last month, its lowest level since November 2009. Ministers are hoping that lower inflation will boost real income growth during the course of 2012.

VERBAL REASONING QUESTION 1

Ministers hope that higher inflation will boost real income growth during 2012.

VERBAL REASONING QUESTION 2

Analyst’s predicted a 0.4% rise in the sales of household goods.

VERBAL REASONING QUESTION 3

The crisis in the eurozone is contributing to the squeeze on incomes.

 ANSWERS TO SAMPLE VERBAL REASONING TEST

Q1. The sentence states that ministers hope that ‘lower’ inflation will boost real income growth, not higher. Therefore, the statement is false (B).

Q2. The passage states that analysts were predicting a 0.4% fall in sales of household goods, not rise. Therefore, the statement is false (B).

Q3. This statement is true (A) based on the information provided in the passage.

How To Pass Verbal Reasoning Tests

The following guide contains lots of sample test questions to help you prepare fully for the assessment.

HOW TO PASS VERBAL REASONING TESTS

228-page Verbal Reasoning Tests book!

HERE’S WHAT IS INCLUDED WITHIN THIS 200-PAGE BOOK

TOP TIPS AND GUIDANCE ON HOW TO PASS THE TESTS

• Pre-test preparation advice.
• Over 200 pages entirely dedicated to verbal reasoning tests.
• Sample tests of varying difficulty.
• Scores of verbal reasoning test questions.

LOTS OF DIFFERENT VERBAL REASONING QUESTIONS

• Verbal text extracts to assess your ability.
• Verbal comprehension tests and how to pass them.
• In-depth answer sections.
• Advice on how to answer the test questions.
• How to avoid the common pitfalls.
• Free testing resources.
• Written by a verbal reasoning test expert.
• How to increase your chances of success.
• Clear, approachable style.

PLUS MANY MORE PAGES OF ESSENTIAL INFORMATION.

AND, when you order the powerful 250-page Verbal Reasoning tests book by Richard McMunn you will also receive free 30-days access to online verbal reasoning tests.

verbal-free-online-testing-suite

You will receive 30-days FREE ACCESS to our awesome online verbal reasoning testing suite that will give you sample tests very similar to the tests you will undertake during your career assessment centre. After the 30 days free trial is over the service is automatically charged at just £4.95 plus vat per month with no minimum term. Cancel any time by contacting us at info@how2become.com. See our terms and conditions for more details.

HOW TO PASS VERBAL REASONING TESTS

228-page Verbal Reasoning Tests book!

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