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Admiralty Interview Board (AIB): Career Starter Pack [Free Resource]

Are you thinking about a career in the Royal Navy? Do you want to become a Royal Navy Officer? If you are considering a career as a Royal Navy Officer, then you will need to undergo the Admiralty Interview Board (AIB). The AIB is one element of the Royal Navy Officer Selection process, and you will need to pass this if you wish to be successful.

WHAT IS THE AIB?

The AIB, or the Admiralty Interview Board forms part of the Royal Navy Officer selection process. The AIB will consist of a series of tests and interviews which will determine whether or not you have what it takes to join the Armed Forces.

If you apply for a position as a Royal Navy Officer, you will be expected to attend the Admiralty Interview Board, which will last for 2 days.

Full details of your time at the Admiralty Interview Board are listed below. Please note that these are subject to changes, and will need to be confirmed when you are invited to attend your AIB.

WHAT TO BRING WITH YOU

The Admiralty Interview Board will last for two days, and therefore, you need to make sure that you have brought everything with you.

Below is a list of all the things you will be expected to bring with you:

Invitation Letter Photo ID (passport, driving license, student card) Nightwear Toilet bag
Bath towel Bath robe Swimming costume Extra socks (for gym tasks)
Formal clothes for interview Training shoes (suitable for running) Fitness clothes (shorts and shirt) Water bottle
4 passport sized photographs A calculator Money (for additional drinks and food)

ARRIVING AT THE AIB

Candidates need to make their own arrangements to the AIB.

  • Candidates arriving by car will receive 25p for their mileage, using the most direct route from their residence to the AIB location. Once you arrive at the AIB, you should report to Caledonia Gate or Vulcan.
  • If you wish to travel by train, you will need to purchase your own train tickets. These travel costs can be redeemed and will be based on the most direct route to Faregan station or Portsmouth Harbour. If you arrive at Portsmouth Harbour, you will need to board the ferry.
  • There is no direct bus service to HMS Sultan, and so you need to ensure you have money to pay for a taxi service.
  • If you arrive by coach, you will need to purchase tickets to Fareham or Portsmouth Harbour, and then follow the instructions as mentioned above.
  • For any candidates who are coming by air, you will need to book the most economical flight to Southampton Airport. From there, you will need to travel by train. Please note, taxi fares from airports are generally not refunded.

Please note, access to the AIB HMS Sultan on weekdays before 1730, you will need to enter the location via Vulcan Gate on Grange Road.

If you arrive at the AIB after 1730 hours, or on a bank holiday, you will need to enter the location via Caledonia Gate on Military Road.

The AIB is situated at HMS Sultan in Hampshire. You will be given strict instructions as to when you should arrive at the location, but generally:

  • You should arrive at the location between 1100 hours and 1230 hours. NOTE – times will be in military time! Just a key thing to bear in mind!

Upon arrival, you should report to the reception desk whereby you will be given further instructions regarding your time at the AIB.

  • On arrival, it is important that you make a good first impression. Remember, you are applying for a highly respected position, and therefore impressions go a long way!
  • Dress in a formal outfit. The Armed Forces are well known for their pristine appearance and charisma. You should do your best to adhere to a smart, well-groomed appearance that highlights that you too want to be considered as respected and proud to wear a formal uniform.

THE COSTS OF THE AIB

The AIB takes in to consideration the costs of travelling to and from the centre. You will be able to claim back some of your travel costs, which can be claimed back using the travelling expenses form.

  • Although you will be refunded for travel expenses, you will be required to have enough money to pay for these yourself. Receipts will need to be obtained in order to reclaim your fares.

Costs of travel will cover the most direct route from your location to the AIB. Your place or residence will need to be in England or Ireland in order to claim back your travel expenses.

Should you need to stay longer, accommodation and costs will need to be paid by you. Only in exceptional circumstances will these costs be considered as additional expenses to be paid.

Please bring additional money if you wish to purchase any additional snacks, food or drinks during your stay at the AIB.

FOOD AND ACCOMODATION

During your stay at the AIB, food and accommodation will be supplied, free of charge.

As mentioned previously, if you need to stay longer than the required 2 days, you will need to make your own arrangements, and this will need to be paid by you.

On the day of arrival, if you arrive before 1200 hours, you will be provided with lunch.

MEDICALS AND FITNESS

The Royal Navy is a strenuous career and therefore, candidates are required to be extremely fit.

  • You will need to sign a declaration regarding your fitness, highlighting that you are fit and healthy to take part in the AIB, including the Practical Leaderships Tasks (PLTs).
  • You will also be required to partake in a 2.4 kilometre run.
  • Candidates aged 40 years or over can opt to take the Rockport Walk instead of the 2.4 kilometre run.

DRESS CODE

The Armed Forces is a prestine career and therefore appearance is extremely important when it comes to respect and professionalism.

As mentioned earlier, upon arrival you should be wearing formal clothing. Formal clothes are expected throughout the two days.

  • Formal clothes for men include a suit and shoes.
  • Formal clothes for women include smart dress or trousers.

THE AIB TESTS

During the two days at the Admiralty Interview Board, all candidates will undergo a series of tests. These tests have been specifically designed to ensure that candidates have the required skills and attributes to obtain a career as an Officer once their training is complete.

All candidates will undergo three different tests:

  • Numerical Reasoning
  • Verbal Reasoning
  • Abstract Reasoning

These tests will be completed on a computer, and results will be recorded using mouse control.

You will be given a set of instructions for each assessment. You should read through these carefully before you begin your test. These instructions can also be looked at again by clicking the ‘Question Mark’ button on the screen. By referring back to these during the test will affect how long you have to answer the questions.

After the instructions, you will be given example questions whereby you will then be able to practice some further questions before the real test begins.

The most important thing to remember in regards to the AIB tests is timing. These tests will be conducted under a strict time limit and therefore adds even more pressure to do well. The time limit is often set with the intention of making is difficult to answer all of the questions in the allotted time. This is fine, and you should not panic if you have not answered all of the questions!

The key is to work through the questions as quickly as you can, without sacrificing accuracy. If you are unable to answer a question, move on and then come back to it at the end if you have time. Remember you do not have the time to ponder over questions. Efficiency is key!

NUMERICAL REASONING

In your AIB Numerical Reasoning assessment, you will be given 36 questions in which you will need to complete in 15 minutes.

The purpose of the Numerical Reasoning assessment is to assess candidates’ ability to solve mathematical problems.

For each question, you will be given five answer options, of which you will have to pick the correct one.

The questions will be styled in the format as follows:

  • You will be given information based on numerical data.
  • Using this data, you must answer the questions that relates to that information.

Calculators are NOT permitted.

EXAMPLE AIB NUMERICAL REASONING QUESTIONS

Study the following chart and answer tht four questions that follow.

Country Jan Feb Mar April May June Total
UK 21 28 15 35 31 20 150
Germany 45 48 52 36 41 40 262
France 32 36 33 28 20 31 180
Brazil 42 41 37 32 35 28 215
Spain 22 26 17 30 24 22 141
Italy 33 35 38 28 29 38 201
Total 195 214 192 189 180 179 1149

Question 1

What percentage of the overall total was sold in April?

A B C D E
17.8% 17.2% 18.9% 16.4% 21.6%

Answer =D = 16.4

EXPLANATION = to work out the percentage overall total that was sold in April, divide how many bikes were sold in April (189) by the total (1149) and then multiply it by 100. (189 ÷ 1149 x 100 = 16.4).

Question 2 What percentage of the overall total sales were bikes’ sold to the French importer?

A B C D E
15.7% 18.2% 18.9% 25.6% 24.5%

Answer = A = 15.7%

EXPLANTATION = to work out the overall percentage total that was sold to France, divide how many bikes were sold to France (180) by the total (1149) and then multiply it by 100. (180 ÷ 1149 x 100 = 15.66). Rounded up to 1 decimal place = 15.7.

Question 3

What is the average number of units per month imported to Brazil over the first 4 months of the year?

A B C D E
28 24 32 38 40

Answer = D = 38

EXPLANTATION = to work out the average number of units per month imported to Brazil over the first 4 months of the year, you add up the first 4 amounts (Jan-April) and then divide it by how many numbers there are (4). So, (42 + 41 + 37 + 32 = 152 ÷ 4 = 38).

Question 4

What month saw the biggest increase in total sales from the previous month?

A B C D E
January February March April May

Answer = B = February

EXPLANATION = to work out the biggest increase in total sales from the previous month, you work out the difference between the totals for each of the month and work out which has the biggest increase. Between January and February, there was an increase by 19. None of the other months have a bigger increase and therefore February is the correct answer.

PRACTICE AIB NUMERICAL REASONING QUESTIONS

The above table shows imports for three types of properties over a 6 month period.

AIB Numerical Reasoning Question Graph 1

Question 1

What is the difference between the number of properties sold in February and the number of properties sold in May?

A B C D E
950 250 1,500 2,500 1,795

Question 2

Which month showed the largest total increase in the number of properties sold over the 6 month period?

A B C D E
May March February January June

Question 3

What is the range for houses sold (thousands) across the 6 month period?

A B C D E
2 3 5 1 7

Question 4

What was the approximate ratio of flat to house sales in the first 3 months of the year?

A B C D E
9:3 13:11 12:3 17:8 15:6

Study the following chart and answer the four questions that follow.

 
AIB Numerical Reasoning Question Graph 2

Question 5

What is the mean value for nylon imported over the 6 month period?

A B C D E
42.5 18.5 33.5 49.5 37.5

Question 6

What is the range for polyester imports across the 6 month period?

A B C D E
15 21 23 52 51

Question 7

What was the difference in thousands of tons between cotton material and nylon material imports in the first 3 months of the year?

A B C D E
5 15 24 17 2

Question 8

What was the approximate ratio of polyester and nylon material imports in the first 4 months of the year?

A B C D E
94:120 94:130 92:110 95:100 94:90
ANSWERS TO NUMERICAL REASONING

Q1. D

EXPLANATION: Number of properties sold in February = 12,000. Number of properties sold in May = 9,500. So, the difference = 12,000 – 9,500 = 2,500.

Q2. C

EXPLANATION: the highest increase was between January and February. January’s total = 6,500, February’s total = 12,000. The difference is 5,500, no other months have a higher increased number.

Q3. B

EXPLANATION: to work out the range, find the smallest and highest number of houses. (2) and (5) So, 5 – 2 = 3 (thousands) .

Q4. B

EXPLANATION: 13,000:11,000. Divide both numbers by 1000 to give you 13:11.

Q5.C = 33.5

EXPLANATION = nylon material = 34 + 32 + 36 + 28 + 40 + 31 = 201 ÷ 6 = 33.5.

Q6. A = 15

EXPLANATION = to work out the range, find the smallest and highest number of polyester imports (18) and (33) So, 33 – 18 = 15 (thousands).

Q7. E = 2

EXPLANATION = to work out the difference, add up the first 3 months for cotton (38 + 22 + 40 = 100). Add up the first 3 months for nylon (34 + 32 + 36 = 102). So, the difference between cotton and nylon = 102 – 100 = 2 (thousands).

Q8. B = 94:130

EXPLANATION = 94,000:130,000. Divide both numbers by 1000 to give you 94:130.

AIB VERBAL REASONING QUESTIONS

For your AIB Verbal Reasoning assessment, you will be given 40 questions, in which you have 15 minutes to answers them. The Verbal Reasoning test is an assessment, which is specifically designed to assess candidates’ ability to think logically about written information.

For this test, you will be provided a passage of written information, which you will need to read carefully. You will then be provided with several statements based on that passage, and you will need to decide whether that statement is true, false or impossible to say.

  • TRUE = Based solely on the information contained in the passage, the statement is true and logically follows from the passage.
  • FALSE = Based solely on the information contained in the passage, the statement is false and follows no logical pattern.
  • IMPOSSIBLE TO SAY = Based solely on the information contained in the passage, you cannot determine whether the statement is true or false.

EXAMPLE AIB VERBAL REASONING QUESTIONS

Barry and Bill work at their local supermarket in the town of Whiteham. Barry works every day except Wednesday.

The supermarket is run by Barry’s brother Elliot, who is married to Sarah. Sarah and Elliot have two children called Marcus and Michelle who are both seven-years-old and they live in the road adjacent to the supermarket.

Barry lives in a town called Redford, which is seven miles from Whiteham. Bill’s girlfriend, Maria, works in a factory in her hometown of Brownhaven.

The town of Redford is four miles from Whiteham and six miles from the seaside town of Tenford. Sarah and Elliot take their children on holiday to Tenford twice a year and Barry usually gives them a lift in his car. Barry’s mum lives in Tenford and he tries to visit her once a week at 2pm when he is not working.

Question 1

Brownhaven is seven miles from whiteham.

A – True

B – False

C – Impossible to say

Answer = C – Impossible to say

EXPLANATION: Based on the information provided in the passage, it is impossible to say whether this statement is true or false.

Question 2

Barry works at the local supermarket on Sundays.

A – True

B – False

C – Impossible to say

Answer = A – True

EXPLANATION: The passage confirms that“Barry works every day except Wednesday.” The statement is, therefore, true.

Question 3

The town of Redford is four miles from the town of Tenford.

A – True

B – False

C – Impossible to say

Answer = B – False

EXPLANATION: The passage states that“The town of Redford is four miles from Whiteham and six miles from the seaside town of Tenford.” The statement is, therefore, false based on the information provided.

PRACTICE AIB VERBAL REASONING QUESTIONS

A data warehouse is the main source of information for an organisation’s historical data. Its historical data is often referred to as its corporate memory. As an example of how a data warehouse can be put to good use, an organisation would use the information stored in its data warehouse to find out how many particular stock items they sold on a particular day in a particular year. They could also ascertain which employees were off sick on any given day or any given year. The data stored within the warehouse contains essential information so that managers can make appropriate management decisions.

A data warehouse is normally large in size as the information stored usually focuses on basic, structured and organised data. Some of the characteristics of the data in a data warehouse are as follows:

Time-variant - changes to the data in the database are tracked and recorded so that reports can be produced showing changes over time;

Non-volatile - the data in the database is never over-written or deleted but is retained for future reporting; Integrated - the database contains data from most or all of an organisation’s operational applications and this data is useful and meaningful for further processing and analysis.

Question 1

Integrated and non-volatile data form some of the characteristics of a data warehouse.

A – True

B – False

C – Impossible to say

Question 2

It is not possible to identify which employees were on sick leave from the information stored in a data warehouse.

A – True

B – False

C – Impossible to say

Question 3

Corporate memory is an alternative name given to historical data.

A – True

B – False

C – Impossible to say

The entire selection process for becoming a magistrate can take approximately 12 months, sometimes longer depending on the area.

Once you have been accepted you will be required to undertake a comprehensive training course which is usually held over a 3-day period (18 hours). During this course you will learn the necessary skills that are required in order to become a magistrate.

The training is normally carried out by the Justice Clerk who is responsible for the court. He/she will usually be the legal advisor during your magistrate sittings. They will help you to develop all the necessary skills required in order to carry out your duties professionally and competently.

You will carry out your training as part of a group with other people who have been recruited at the same time as you. This is extremely beneficial as it will allow you to learn in a safe environment.

Training will be given using a variety of methods, which may include pre- course reading, small-group work, use of case studies, computer-based training and CCTV. It is recognised that magistrates are volunteers and that their time is valuable, so every effort is made to provide all training at times and places convenient to trainees. The Ministry of Justice booklet ‘Serving as a Magistrate’ has more information about the magistracy and the role of magistrates.

Question 4

The comprehensive training course for becoming a magistrate usually consists of 3 days which is divided into 6 hours training per day.

A – True

B – False

C – Impossible to say

Question 5

An applicant can find out more about the role of a magistrate by reading the Ministry of Justice booklet ‘Serving as a Magistrate’.

A – True

B – False

C – Impossible to say

Question 6

The selection process for becoming a magistrate will take no longer than 12 months.

A – True

B – False

C – Impossible to say

ANSWERS TO AIB VERBAL REASONING

Q1. A – true

EXPLANATION: It is true, according to the passage, that some of the characteristics of a data warehouse include integrated and non-volatile data.

Q2. B – false

EXPLANATION: It is possible to ascertain which employees were off sick from the information stored in a data warehouse; therefore, the statement is false.

Q3. A – true

EXPLANATION: It is true that corporate memory is an alternative name given to historical data.

Q4. C – impossible to say

EXPLANATION: The passage does state that the training course is usually held over a 3-day period (18 hours). we could assume that the 18 hours are equally divided into 3 x 6 hour days. However, it is not our job to assume; we must base our answers on what is provided within the passage. Therefore, the correct answer is cannot say.

Q5. A – true

EXPLANATION: From the passage we know this statement to be true.

Q6. B – false

EXPLANATION: This statement is false because the passage states that the selection process can sometimes take longer than 12 months.

AIB ABSTRACT REASONING QUESTIONS

In your AIB Abstract Reasoning test, you will have 70 questions to answer to answer in 12 minutes.

The purpose of Abstract Reasoning is to assess candidates’ ability to identify patterns and correlations between different shapes.

Abstract tests are a great way to assess a range of skills which form an integral part of the Royal Navy Officer role. These skills include the following:

  • The ability to be analytical
  • The ability to be creative
  • The ability to look at the ‘bigger picture’
  • The ability to identify smaller patterns
  • The ability to identify what is relevant and what is not
  • The ability to identify similarities and differences
  • The ability to come up with different ideas and approaches
  • The ability to solve problems based on abstract patterns

During the test, you will be provided two ‘SETS’ of shapes: Set A and Set B. All of shapes in each set are similar in some way. Set A and Set B are not similar.

You will be given a shape, and will have to decide whether it fits in with Set A or Set B. You also have the option of selecting neither (the shape does not fit in with either set).

EXAMPLE AIB ABSTRACT REASONING QUESTIONS

Determine whether the test shapes belong to Set A, Set B or Neither

This question is not easy to answer, simply because you have to think outside of the box in order to achieve the correct answer.

Most people who look at the question will be looking for links between the actual letters themselves,as opposed to how the letters are actually presented.

You will note that each square in Set A includes one letter which includes a straight line and two letters which include curves, whereas each box of Set B contains the opposite, two letters with straight lines and one letter with a curve.

Therefore, the correct answers are:

• Test shape 1 belongs to Set B because it has two straight letters and one curved.

• Test shape 2 belongs to Set A because it has two curved letters and one straight.

• Test shape 3 belongs to neither because it has three curved letters.

PRACTICE AIB ABSTRACT REASONING QUESTIONS

Question 1

Determine whether the test shapes belong to Set A, Set B or Neither.

TEST SHAPE 1 =

TEST SHAPE 2 =

TEST SHAPE 3 =

Question 2

Determine whether the test shapes belong to Set A, Set B or Neither.

TEST SHAPE 1 =

TEST SHAPE 2 =

TEST SHAPE 3 =

Question 3

Determine whether the test shapes belong to Set A, Set B or Neither.

TEST SHAPE 1 =

TEST SHAPE 2 =

TEST SHAPE 3 =

ANSWERS TO ABSTRACT REASONING

Q1. TEST SHAPE A = NEITHER

EXPLANATION: Test shape A does not belong to SET A or SET B because it does not contain the same colour pattern, or the same shapes.

TEST SHAPE B = NEITHER

EXPLANATION: Test shape B does not belong to SET A or SET B because it does not contain the same colour pattern, or the same shapes.

TEST SHAPE C = SET A

EXPLANATION: SET A contains the same colour pattern as this test shape, therefore this test shape fits in to this pattern.

Q2. TEST SHAPE A = NEITHER

EXPLANATION: Test shape A does not belong to SET A or SET B because it does not contain the same colour pattern, or the same shapes.

TEST SHAPE B = NEITHER

EXPLANATION: Test shape B does not belong to SET A or SET B because it does not contain the same colour pattern, or the same shapes.

TEST SHAPE C = NEITHER

EXPLANATION: Test shape C does not belong to SET A or SET B because it does not contain the same colour pattern, or the same shapes.

Q3. TEST SHAPE A = SET A

EXPLANATION: SET A contains the same colour pattern as this test shape, therefore this test shape fits in to this pattern.

TEST SHAPE B = NEITHER

EXPLANATION: Test shape B does not belong to SET A or SET B because it does not contain the same colour pattern, or the same shapes.

TEST SHAPE C = NEITHER

EXPLANATION: Test shape C does not belong to SET A or SET B because it does not contain the same colour pattern, or the same shapes.

Royal Navy Officer Admirality Interview Board AIB Workbook Cover

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